Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Corrosion on led strands..?

  1. #1
    Old Man Winter member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,249

    Corrosion on led strands..?

    So I am curious to hear from anyone that has possibly ran into this but I have had numerous LED strands since I first started purchasing full wave LEDs back in 2008 that the wires have seemed to get some copper corrosion on them if you will (thinking this is not the proper term but the wires when stripped look dark and dingy like) So I was curious to see/hear if anyone else has seen this and what you did to correct the problem? I currently have 3 or 4 strands of multi that I purchased back in 2011/2012 that the LEDs only light dimly, upon cutting the wires and stripping them to test on a new rectifier circuit thinking the rectifier was the problem I discovered this corrosion issues. Sadly this is not the first time I have seen this personally but wanted to hear if others had also and if there was/is any kind of solution besides the obvious of buying new strands.. thanks!!

  2. #2
    Junior Elf member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Union, NJ hoping to move to the West coast of Florida where my daughter and grandkids live.
    Posts
    62
    I had purchased 6 sets of blue led net lights a few years ago. After one month of operation, one set went very dim. That set was replaced under warranty. At the close of that season, I had another set that went out completely. The problem was in the plug and socket at each end of the net light. They enclosed a pc board that had water intrusion. I don't know how water got in there since it was sealed completely. None of the plugs or sockets lay on the ground. In order to access the pc boards, I had to destroy the plugs and sockets but found the problem. I actually found a resistor rusted off the pc board on one plug. It was very strange to me that this could have happened in such a short period of time. For safety reasons, I scrapped both sets of net lights. The remaining 4 sets plus the set replaced under warranty have been working perfectly for the last 2 years. Knock on wood! I think that sometimes you can get a bad batch of lights and the following year they learn from there mistakes.
    As for light strands, I haven't had any corrosion issued with them.

  3. #3
    Old Man Winter member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,249
    here is the wires on one of the strands that is now dimly lit.. dont know how it got so dingy and corroded.

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Rudolph member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    322
    I have seen this effect in automotive wiring in areas where element exposure is great. Unloaded voltage was great but no current flow under load.
    I suspect the root cause is a permeable (crappy) insulation possibly together with maybe a sub par grade of copper.

  5. #5
    Junior Elf member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Maryville Tennessee
    Posts
    19
    LED light strings in 2008 had a lot of problem, especially the strings with removable lights.

    China was pushing the technology too hard to supply the world with LED lights and made some mistakes about weather proofing and material selection.

    Wire insulation was one, using the wrong formula for the insulation, it can attack the wire as in your picture and start deteriorating to wire.

    LED leads was the other problem, as LED's back then could only use steel to make the internal connections. They tried to add a coating over the steel leads but it did not stand up to weather condition changes, like water. Today the leads do not use steel and are much better.

  6. #6
    Old Man Winter member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,249
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Cherry View Post
    LED light strings in 2008 had a lot of problem, especially the strings with removable lights.

    China was pushing the technology too hard to supply the world with LED lights and made some mistakes about weather proofing and material selection.

    Wire insulation was one, using the wrong formula for the insulation, it can attack the wire as in your picture and start deteriorating to wire.

    LED leads was the other problem, as LED's back then could only use steel to make the internal connections. They tried to add a coating over the steel leads but it did not stand up to weather condition changes, like water. Today the leads do not use steel and are much better.
    I could follow some of this if it were dated to closer to 2008 but several strands that did this were from 2012 and even 2014. Ive got strands that are from 2008 that still actually work that is another thing that has me confused with some of the reason as to why failure like this so soon as youd think fabrication issues would be addressed by now.

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Junior Elf member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Keller TX
    Posts
    64

    Corrosion on led strands..?

    I had similar issues with all my wiring this past 2 years. After some research I figured the cause was aluminum material. A lot of the wires are either aluminum or copper clad aluminum. Mixing metal types causes corrosion due to chemical processes, ie the steel referenced in a previous post. Aluminum corrodes when exposed to air.

    It can even caused by nicks in the cladding of the wiring which exposes the aluminum to the air and potential water ingress. I end up replacing all of my wiring and discarding a large number of my plugs from Ray. I now use heat shrink with glue to provide a water tight environment.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Senior Elf member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dothan, Alabama
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by stampedeboss View Post
    I had similar issues with all my wiring this past 2 years. After some research I figured the cause was aluminum material. A lot of the wires are either aluminum or copper clad aluminum. Mixing metal types causes corrosion due to chemical processes, ie the steel referenced in a previous post. Aluminum corrodes when exposed to air.

    It can even caused by nicks in the cladding of the wiring which exposes the aluminum to the air and potential water ingress. I end up replacing all of my wiring and discarding a large number of my plugs from Ray. I now use heat shrink with glue to provide a water tight environment.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Galvanic corrosion is the term, I think. Corrosion when two dissimilar metals are connected together.

  9. #9
    Old Man Winter member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    1,249
    Quote Originally Posted by Amigorick View Post
    Galvanic corrosion is the term, I think. Corrosion when two dissimilar metals are connected together.
    why am I not seeing alluminum in the wires? normally on a copper clad aluminum you can see the difference in materials? it seems more like a moisture issue like water intrusion into the "sealed" components but how or why is the better question??

  10. #10
    Junior Elf member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Maryville Tennessee
    Posts
    19
    Just discovered some 2018 LED lights from a very large US company that has the LED lead problem again.

    Someone in China may be trying to make too much profit.

    Looking into what is going on with these lights.

    Yes, they are labeled as 06/18 on the UL tag.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •